NEU 300

Neuroscience at Wake Forest University

Wake Forest University provides a comprehensive program in neuroscience through an interdisciplinary minor.


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Neuroscience

NEU 300

Date                      (Host) and Speaker                                  Student                     Title

Th Jan      13 Wayne Silver Introduction
Tu            18 Host: Jim Schirillo (Psy) Greg Now you see it, now you don’t – now you do!
Th            20 John McHaffie Cross-modal rehabilitation in an animal model of visual hemineglect
Tu            25 Host: Susan Fahrbach (Bio) Kim Environmental complexity and brain plasticity in mice:  An ethological/
Th            27 Ron Oppenheim Elaine neuroethological perspective
Tu Feb     1 Host: Miriam Ashley-Ross (Bio) Rebecca Estrogen and the brain: What’s the
Th            3 Mary Lou Voytko Sammy buzz?
Tu            8 Host: Erik Johnson (Bio) Kiara Protecting neurons from the stresses of
Th            10 Mike Tytell James life – The role of heat shock proteins.
Tu            15 Host: Wayne Silver (Bio) Ryan Effects of training on the representation
Th           17 Christos Constantinidis of working memory in brain activity
Tu            22 Host: Anita McCauley (Bio) Alice Brain Aging
Th            24 David Riddle Alex F.
Tu Mar     1 Host: Susan Fahrbach Alex H. Brain plasticity in adults
Th            3 Susan Fahrbach Mary – “Re”
Tu            8 SPRING BREAK
Th            10 SPRING BREAK
Tu            15 Host: Wayne Pratt (Psy) Genea Nonhuman primate models of substance abuse:
Th            17 Paul Czoty Jordan Abuse liability and medication effectiveness
Tu            22 Host: Katy Läck (Bio) Jamil Monkeys self-administering cocaine:
Th            24                3 Mike Nader Shannon What that can tell us about our brain and our behavior
Tu            29 Host: Katy Läck (Bio) Brad Translational Research of Radiation Injury to the
Th            31 Ann Peiffer Amin Brain: of Rat, Monkey and Wo\Man
Tu Apr     5 Host: Katy Läck (Bio) Natalie Building a brain network from
Th            7 Satoru Hayasaka Devon functional MRI
Tu            12 Host: Bill Conner (Bio) Ryan F. Keratin biomaterials for nerve tissue
Th            14 Mark Van Dyke Wilson regeneration
Tu            19 Host: Wayne Silver (Bio) Alex W. Neuroscience of pain
Th            21 James Eisenach Tarick
Tu            26 Evaluation

Grading:

Assignments and Quizes: 90%

Students will be graded on either written assignments or quizzes each week.

An announcement will be made after the Thursday seminar informing students of which of the following assessments will be assigned:

1) A short answer ten question (10 point) quiz that will be given during the first 15 minutes of the following class.

2) A one page (10 point) summary of the Thursday seminar to include

a) a concise statement of the question being addressed (2 points)

b) a concise statement of the results obtained. (2 points)

c) a brief description of the methods used to address the question. (2 points)

d) a discussion of how this study advances our knowledge of this subject? What is the “Big Picture”? (2 points)

3) A one page paper (10 point) theorizing future directions of the research presented at the seminar

This can include, but is not limited to, suggesting “the next step” in the research or applying this research to a different field.

4) A one page paper (10 point) suggesting the real world implications of the research presented.

Why should we care about the research presented?

Rather than telling stating that “the research will help people with, for example, hemineglect”, explain what the problem is, why it needs to be studied and how the research can help.

The quality of your writing and your scientific accuracy are each worth 1 point for all of the writing assignments.

You will be allowed to drop your lowest assignment grade.

Participation: 10%

Each student will be assigned to one or more of the seminars, and along with the Neuroscience Faculty Host, will be responsible for leading the Tuesday discussions. Your participation grade is based on your contributions to class discussions as well as how you “lead” your assigned discussion. Please contact the Faculty Host before your presentation.

READINGS

John McHaffie

Jiang H, BE Stein, and JG McHaffie (2009) Cortical lesion-induced visual hemineglect is prevented by NMDA antagonist pretreatment. J. Neurosci. 29(21): 6917-6925.

Ron Oppenheim

Amrein I, Lipp H-P (2009) Adult hippocampal neurogenesis of mammals:  evolution and life history.  Biology Letters 5:141-144.

Kempermann G, Kuhn HG, Gage FH (1997) More hippocampal neurons in adult mice living in an enriched environment.  Nature 386:493-496.

Mary Lou Voytko

Sherwin, BB and Henry JF. (2008) Brain aging modulates the neuroprotective effects of estrogen

on selective aspects of cognition in women: A critical review. Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology 29: 88–113.

Mike Tytell

Robinson MB, Taylor AR, Gifondorwa DJ, Tytell M, Milligan CE.(2008) Exogenous Hsc70, but not thermal preconditioning, confers protection to motoneurons subjected to oxidative stress. Dev Neurobiol. 68:1-17.

Christos Constantinidis

Meyer T, Xue-Lian Qi X-L, and Constantinidis C. (2007) Persistent Discharges in the Prefrontal

Cortex of Monkeys Naıve to Working Memory Tasks. Cerebral Cortex 17: i70–i76

David Riddle

Ownby, RL (2010) Neuroinflammation and cognitive aging. Curr Psychiatry Rep 12:39–45.

Bishop, NA, Tao Lu, T, and Yankner, BA (2010) Neural mechanisms of ageing

and cognitive decline. Nature 464:529-535.

Susan Fahrbach

Ismail N, Robinson GE, Fahrbach SE (2006) Stimulation of muscarinic receptors mimics experience-dependent plasticity in the honey bee brain. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 103:207-11.

Fahrbach, S.E. and Dobrin, S (2008) The how and why of structural plasticity in the honey bee brain, In: Cognitive Ecology II, R Dukas and J Ratcliffe, eds. University of Chicago Press, 27-46.

Paul Czoty

Czoty, PW, Gould, RW, Martelle JL and Nader, MA (2010) Prolonged Attenuation of the Reinforcing Strength of Cocaine by Chronic d-Amphetamine in Rhesus Monkeys. Neuropsychopharm [Epub ahead of print]

Czoty PW, Ramanathan CR, Mutschler NH, Makriyannis A, Bergman J. (2004) Drug discrimination in methamphetamine-trained monkeys: effects of monoamine transporter inhibitors. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 311(2):720-7.

Nader MA, Czoty PW. (2005) PET imaging of dopamine D2 receptors in monkey models of cocaine abuse: genetic predisposition versus environmental modulation. Am J Psychiatry., 162:1473-82.

Mike Nader

Morgan D, Grant KA, Gage HD, Mach RH, Kaplan JR, Prioleau O, Nader SH, Buchheimer N, Ehrenkaufer RL, Nader MA. (2002) Social dominance in monkeys: dopamine D2 receptors and cocaine self-administration. Nat Neurosci. 5:169-74.

Nader MA, Morgan D, Gage HD, Nader SH, Calhoun TL, Buchheimer N, Ehrenkaufer R, Mach RH. (2006) PET imaging of dopamine D2 receptors during chronic cocaine self-administration in monkeys. Nat Neurosci. 9:1050-6.

Ann Peiffer

Robbins, ME, Bourland, JD, Cline, JM, Wheeler, KT and Deadwyler, SA. (2010) A model for assessing cognitive impairment after fractionated whole-brain irradiation in nonhuman primates” In Press

Robbins, ME, Brunso-Bechtold, JK, Peiffer, AM, Tsien, CI, Bailey, J and Marks, LB. “Imaging radiation-induced normal tissue injury” Mike E. Robbins, (submitted manuscript for the course).

Peiffer AM, Shi L, Olson J, and Brunso-Bechtold JK (2010) Differential effects of radiation and age on diffusion tensor imaging in rats. Brain Res., 1351, 23-31.

Satoru Hayasaka

Bullmore, E and Sporns, O. (2009) Complex brain networks: graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional systems. Nature Review Neurosci 10: 186-198

Mark Van Dyke

Belkas JS, Shoichet MS, Midha R. Peripheral nerve regeneration through guidance tubes. Neurol Res. 2004;26(2):151-60

Sierpinski P, Garrett J, Ma J, Apel P, Klorig D, Smith T, Koman LA, Atala A, Van Dyke M. The use of keratin biomaterials derived from human hair for the promotion of rapid regeneration of peripheral nerves. Biomaterials 2008;29(1):118-28

James Eisenach

Basbaum AI, Bautista DM, Scherrer G, Julius D. (2009) Cellular and molecular mechanisms of pain. Cell.139(2):267-84.

Grading:

Assignments and Quizes: 90%

Students will be graded on either written assignments or quizzes each week.

An announcement will be made after the Thursday seminar informing students of which of the following assessments will be assigned:

1) A short answer ten question (10 point) quiz that will be given during the first 15 minutes of the following class.

2) A one page (10 point) summary of the Thursday seminar to include

1) a concise statement of the question being addressed (2 points)

2) a concise statement of the results obtained. (2 points)

3) a brief description of the methods used to address the question. (2 points)

4) a discussion of how this study advances our knowledge of this subject? What is the “Big Picture”? (2 points)

3) A one page paper (10 point) theorizing future directions of the research presented at the seminar

This can include, but is not limited to, suggesting “the next step” in the research or applying this research to a different field.

4) A one page paper (10 point) suggesting the real world implications of the research presented.

Why should we care about the research presented?

Rather than telling stating that “the research will help people with, for example, hemineglect”, explain what the problem is, why it needs to be studied and how the research can help.

The quality of your writing and your scientific accuracy are each worth 1 point for all of the writing assignments.

You will be allowed to drop your lowest assignment grade.

Participation: 10%

Each student will be assigned to one or more of the seminars, and along with the Neuroscience Faculty Host, will be responsible for leading the Tuesday discussions. Your participation grade is based on your contributions to class discussions as well as how you “lead” your assigned discussion. Please contact the Faculty Host before your presentation.

READINGS

John McHaffie

Jiang H, BE Stein, and JG McHaffie (2009) Cortical lesion-induced visual hemineglect is prevented by NMDA antagonist pretreatment. J. Neurosci. 29(21): 6917-6925.

Ron Oppenheim

Amrein I, Lipp H-P (2009) Adult hippocampal neurogenesis of mammals:  evolution and life history.  Biology Letters 5:141-144.

Kempermann G, Kuhn HG, Gage FH (1997) More hippocampal neurons in adult mice living in an enriched environment.  Nature 386:493-496.

Mary Lou Voytko

Sherwin, BB and Henry JF. (2008) Brain aging modulates the neuroprotective effects of estrogen

on selective aspects of cognition in women: A critical review. Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology 29: 88–113.

Mike Tytell

Robinson MB, Taylor AR, Gifondorwa DJ, Tytell M, Milligan CE.(2008) Exogenous Hsc70, but not thermal preconditioning, confers protection to motoneurons subjected to oxidative stress. Dev Neurobiol. 68:1-17.

Christos Constantinidis

Meyer T, Xue-Lian Qi X-L, and Constantinidis C. (2007) Persistent Discharges in the Prefrontal

Cortex of Monkeys Naıve to Working Memory Tasks. Cerebral Cortex 17: i70–i76

David Riddle

Ownby, RL (2010) Neuroinflammation and cognitive aging. Curr Psychiatry Rep 12:39–45.

Bishop, NA, Tao Lu, T, and Yankner, BA (2010) Neural mechanisms of ageing

and cognitive decline. Nature 464:529-535.

Susan Fahrbach

Ismail N, Robinson GE, Fahrbach SE (2006) Stimulation of muscarinic receptors mimics experience-dependent plasticity in the honey bee brain. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 103:207-11.

Fahrbach, S.E. and Dobrin, S (2008) The how and why of structural plasticity in the honey bee brain, In: Cognitive Ecology II, R Dukas and J Ratcliffe, eds. University of Chicago Press, 27-46.

Paul Czoty

Czoty, PW, Gould, RW, Martelle JL and Nader, MA (2010) Prolonged Attenuation of the Reinforcing Strength of Cocaine by Chronic d-Amphetamine in Rhesus Monkeys. Neuropsychopharm [Epub ahead of print]

Czoty PW, Ramanathan CR, Mutschler NH, Makriyannis A, Bergman J. (2004) Drug discrimination in methamphetamine-trained monkeys: effects of monoamine transporter inhibitors. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 311(2):720-7.

Nader MA, Czoty PW. (2005) PET imaging of dopamine D2 receptors in monkey models of cocaine abuse: genetic predisposition versus environmental modulation. Am J Psychiatry., 162:1473-82.

Mike Nader

Morgan D, Grant KA, Gage HD, Mach RH, Kaplan JR, Prioleau O, Nader SH, Buchheimer N, Ehrenkaufer RL, Nader MA. (2002) Social dominance in monkeys: dopamine D2 receptors and cocaine self-administration. Nat Neurosci. 5:169-74.

Nader MA, Morgan D, Gage HD, Nader SH, Calhoun TL, Buchheimer N, Ehrenkaufer R, Mach RH. (2006) PET imaging of dopamine D2 receptors during chronic cocaine self-administration in monkeys. Nat Neurosci. 9:1050-6.

Ann Peiffer

Robbins, ME, Bourland, JD, Cline, JM, Wheeler, KT and Deadwyler, SA. (2010) A model for assessing cognitive impairment after fractionated whole-brain irradiation in nonhuman primates” In Press

Robbins, ME, Brunso-Bechtold, JK, Peiffer, AM, Tsien, CI, Bailey, J and Marks, LB. “Imaging radiation-induced normal tissue injury” Mike E. Robbins, (submitted manuscript for the course).

Peiffer AM, Shi L, Olson J, and Brunso-Bechtold JK (2010) Differential effects of radiation and age on diffusion tensor imaging in rats. Brain Res., 1351, 23-31.

Satoru Hayasaka

Bullmore, E and Sporns, O. (2009) Complex brain networks: graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional syst

Grading:

Assignments and Quizes: 90%

Students will be graded on either written assignments or quizzes each week.

An announcement will be made after the Thursday seminar informing students of which of the following assessments will be assigned:

1)      A short answer ten question (10 point) quiz that will be given during the first 15 minutes of the following class.

2)      A one page (10 point) summary of the Thursday seminar to include

1)      a concise statement of the question being addressed (2 points)

2)      a concise statement of the results obtained. (2 points)

3)      a brief description of the methods used to address the question. (2 points)

4)      a discussion of how this study advances our knowledge of this subject? What is the “Big Picture”? (2 points)

3)      A one page paper (10 point) theorizing future directions of the research presented at the seminar

This can include, but is not limited to, suggesting “the next step” in the research or applying this research to a different field.

4)      A one page paper (10 point) suggesting the real world implications of the research presented.

Why should we care about the research presented?

Rather than telling stating that “the research will help people with, for example, hemineglect”, explain what the problem is, why it needs to be studied and how the research can help.

The quality of your writing and your scientific accuracy are each worth 1 point for all of the writing assignments.

You will be allowed to drop your lowest assignment grade.

Participation: 10%

Each student will be assigned to one or more of the seminars, and along with the Neuroscience Faculty Host, will be responsible for leading the Tuesday discussions. Your participation grade is based on your contributions to class discussions as well as how you “lead” your assigned discussion. Please contact the Faculty Host before your presentation.

READINGS

John McHaffie

Jiang H, BE Stein, and JG McHaffie (2009) Cortical lesion-induced visual hemineglect is prevented by NMDA antagonist pretreatment. J. Neurosci. 29(21): 6917-6925.

Ron Oppenheim

Amrein I, Lipp H-P (2009) Adult hippocampal neurogenesis of mammals:  evolution and life history.  Biology Letters 5:141-144.

Kempermann G, Kuhn HG, Gage FH (1997) More hippocampal neurons in adult mice living in an enriched environment.  Nature 386:493-496.

Mary Lou Voytko

Sherwin, BB and Henry JF. (2008) Brain aging modulates the neuroprotective effects of estrogen

on selective aspects of cognition in women: A critical review. Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology 29: 88–113.

Mike Tytell

Robinson MB, Taylor AR, Gifondorwa DJ, Tytell M, Milligan CE.(2008) Exogenous Hsc70, but not thermal preconditioning, confers protection to motoneurons subjected to oxidative stress. Dev Neurobiol. 68:1-17.

Christos Constantinidis

Meyer T, Xue-Lian Qi X-L, and Constantinidis C. (2007) Persistent Discharges in the Prefrontal

Cortex of Monkeys Naıve to Working Memory Tasks. Cerebral Cortex 17: i70–i76

David Riddle

Ownby, RL (2010) Neuroinflammation and cognitive aging. Curr Psychiatry Rep 12:39–45.

Bishop, NA, Tao Lu, T, and Yankner, BA (2010) Neural mechanisms of ageing

and cognitive decline. Nature 464:529-535.

Susan Fahrbach

Ismail N, Robinson GE, Fahrbach SE (2006) Stimulation of muscarinic receptors mimics experience-dependent plasticity in the honey bee brain. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 103:207-11.

Fahrbach, S.E. and Dobrin, S (2008) The how and why of structural plasticity in the honey bee brain, In: Cognitive Ecology II, R Dukas and J Ratcliffe, eds. University of Chicago Press, 27-46.

Paul Czoty

Czoty, PW, Gould, RW,  Martelle JL and Nader, MA (2010) Prolonged Attenuation of the Reinforcing Strength of Cocaine by Chronic d-Amphetamine in Rhesus Monkeys. Neuropsychopharm  [Epub ahead of print]

Czoty PW, Ramanathan CR, Mutschler NH, Makriyannis A, Bergman J. (2004) Drug discrimination in methamphetamine-trained monkeys: effects of monoamine transporter inhibitors. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 311(2):720-7.

Nader MA, Czoty PW. (2005) PET imaging of dopamine D2 receptors in monkey models of cocaine abuse: genetic predisposition versus environmental modulation. Am J Psychiatry., 162:1473-82.

Mike Nader

Morgan D, Grant KA, Gage HD, Mach RH, Kaplan JR, Prioleau O, Nader SH, Buchheimer N, Ehrenkaufer RL, Nader MA. (2002) Social dominance in monkeys: dopamine D2 receptors and cocaine self-administration. Nat Neurosci. 5:169-74.

Nader MA, Morgan D, Gage HD, Nader SH, Calhoun TL, Buchheimer N, Ehrenkaufer R, Mach RH. (2006) PET imaging of dopamine D2 receptors during chronic cocaine self-administration in monkeys. Nat Neurosci. 9:1050-6.

Ann Peiffer

Robbins, ME, Bourland, JD, Cline, JM, Wheeler, KT and Deadwyler, SA. (2010) A model for assessing cognitive impairment after fractionated whole-brain irradiation in nonhuman primates” In Press

Robbins, ME, Brunso-Bechtold, JK, Peiffer, AM, Tsien, CI, Bailey, J and Marks, LB. “Imaging radiation-induced normal tissue injury” Mike E. Robbins, (submitted manuscript for the course).

Peiffer AM, Shi L, Olson J, and Brunso-Bechtold JK (2010) Differential effects of radiation and age on diffusion tensor imaging in rats. Brain Res., 1351, 23-31.

Satoru Hayasaka

Bullmore, E and Sporns, O. (2009) Complex brain networks: graph theoretical analysis of structural and functional systems. Nature Review Neurosci 10: 186-198

Mark Van Dyke

Belkas JS, Shoichet MS, Midha R. Peripheral nerve regeneration through guidance tubes. Neurol Res. 2004;26(2):151-60

Sierpinski P, Garrett J, Ma J, Apel P, Klorig D, Smith T, Koman LA, Atala A, Van Dyke M. The use of keratin biomaterials derived from human hair for the promotion of rapid regeneration of peripheral nerves. Biomaterials 2008;29(1):118-28

James Eisenach

Basbaum AI, Bautista DM, Scherrer G, Julius D. (2009) Cellular and molecular mechanisms of pain. Cell.139(2):267-84.

ems. Nature Review Neurosci 10: 186-198

Mark Van Dyke

Belkas JS, Shoichet MS, Midha R. Peripheral nerve regeneration through guidance tubes. Neurol Res. 2004;26(2):151-60

Sierpinski P, Garrett J, Ma J, Apel P, Klorig D, Smith T, Koman LA, Atala A, Van Dyke M. The use of keratin biomaterials derived from human hair for the promotion of rapid regeneration of peripheral nerves. Biomaterials 2008;29(1):118-28

James Eisenach

Basbaum AI, Bautista DM, Scherrer G, Julius D. (2009) Cellular and molecular mechanisms of pain. Cell.139(2):267-84.


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